Would You Take Two Steps to Have a Healthy Church? – Part 3

So how can there be a Part 3 if there’s only two steps to a healthy Church?

We have already seen the two steps a pastor must take to help his congregation get stronger–grow himself and build a team. But there are also two steps the people of the church must take to contribute to the same journey. Many congregants know the frustration of a revolving door of pastors with their unique visions, ideas, and strategies. Just when things seem to be coming into focus, something causes a pastoral change and we feel like we’re “back to square one” with someone new.

A frequent change in pastors can lead the congregation to forget that they have some responsibility for what their church is becoming. Frankly, it’s easier to sit back and wait for the new pastor to prove himself or to come up with the right plan that can lead us forward. But churches that move toward health have discovered that the people must get involved and contribute to the new day, often just as much as the pastor.

There are two things that only the people can bring to this equation. The first is the readiness to face reality. Well over half of America’s churches have plateaued or are in decline and the moral drift of our culture is away from the influence of the church more and more each year. Things simply aren’t going to get better at our church unless some intentional steps are taken.

Leadership gurus call it urgency–the “what” that motivates us to see the need for change in our church if we are going to succeed in ways we aren’t succeeding now. Most have heard insanity’s definition–doing what you’ve always done and expecting different results. But, sadly, many congregations seem content to maintain failing ministries and practices that no longer connect with their community. Perhaps like nowhere else in our culture, failure is acceptable at church as long as the remaining members are happy.

I often speak of four questions a church must say “yes” to before a new day can emerge: 1) Do we know we need to change?, 2) Are we willing to change?, 3) Do we know how to change?, and 4) Are we willing to do that? I am always amazed at how unwilling a declining church can be to say “yes” to those first two. Honestly, having the right answer to #3 doesn’t matter if you can’t get a “yes” to the first two.

Yes, we like our church and we like the way things are done at our church. That’s a big part of why we find ourselves attending our church. But if the way we do things isn’t helping us fulfill our mission of reaching people for Christ, are we willing to face that reality? Many aren’t. Even the most amazing pastors can’t help a church get healthy if the people won’t look clearly at the need.

Now, facing reality doesn’t have to mean we take on a “doom and gloom” spirit. Instead, ours should be a determination to fulfill our mission, one that is willing to shift gears if necessary to get back up that hill. Jesus established His Church not to simply be about us, but to be a vehicle through which we can be about the “them” currently outside our walls.

Pastors will often try to call their people to change and new expressions of ministry that can bring a better future, but that pastor often lacks the influence he needs to lead change until he’s been around at leas five years. Since the average tenure of a pastor is typically a but less than that…well, you can see why the people must take responsibility for this attitude toward change.

At the current rate in the Assemblies of God, we will close nearly twenty percent of today’s 13,000 churches in the next ten years. That’s the future unless congregation members are willing to step up and face a reality that can lead to change.

Next week, we’ll consider the second step congregation members must make toward a healthy future for their church.

 

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